HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE SYMPTOMS CAUSES DIET & TREATMENT

Dr.Armughan Riaz
M.B.B.S, Dip Card
Consultant Cardiologist

 

C Reactive Protein | The Effect of High Blood Pressure on C Reactive Protein

The Effect of High Blood Pressure on C Reactive Protein, high blood pressure is an inflammatory disease that causes changes in the endothelium, A change in the endothelium is also caused by increased levels of CRP in the blood, resultantly also increasing blood pressure.

C Reactive Protein | The Effect of High Blood Pressure on C Reactive Protein

 Blood pressure is the measure of the force with which blood hits the arterial walls. It consists of a systolic and diastolic reading. When the reading is 140/90 or above, it is considered high blood pressure. People with high blood pressure have more chances of getting heart disease if they do not control their blood pressure. Research by Dr Paul M Ridker in Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, has also shown that an elevated blood pressure along with elevated C reactive protein, the risks of developing cardiovascular disease becomes eight times greater. In fact, a combination of both can be deadly. C reactive protein (CRP) is the protein or byproduct of inflammation in blood. Even when the blood pressure is not high, an increased CRP reading heightens the risks of heart disease and stroke.

Both conditions together have a double adverse effect on the arteries. In hypertension, the heart is forced to pump harder, thus putting more pressure on the walls of arteries which become damaged due to it. And when the CRP level is also high, this means that there is inflammation in the blood which can be as worrying as an increased cholesterol level. This can also cause the development of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and heart disease.

 

The Effect of Hypertension on C Reactive Protein

There are approximately 50 million hypertensive patients in America according to the estimates of the American Heart Association. It is one of the primary causes of death for Americans. The Journal of the American Medical Association published a study according to which people who have a very high CRP have 52 percent greater chance of developing hypertension than those who have low levels of CRP. Furthermore, people who are obese are also more sensitive towards developing elevated levels of CRP, as observed by Dr. Mary Cushman, professor of Medicine and Pathology at the University of Vermont. She explained that obesity raised the risk to 61 percent for black women; 56 percent for white women; 38 percent for black men; and 31 percent for white men.

C Reactive Protein

There are other researches as well that support Cushman’s observations. A significant link between CRP levels and development of hypertension was also observed by the researchers at Harvard Medical School. These findings prove that high blood pressure is an inflammatory disease that causes changes in the endothelium, a thin layer of cells that line the walls of blood vessels. A change in the endothelium is also caused by increased levels of CRP in the blood, resultantly also increasing blood pressure.

Professor Howard Sesso of Harvard University has provided indicators for those people who can develop high blood pressure. These findings will enable such people to take preventive steps and avoid contracting hypertension.

The best way to prevent high blood pressure is by diet, regular cardio exercise and reducing stress. Diet should not contain high amount of sodium. Moreover, alcohol should be drunk in moderate amounts while smoking should be stopped altogether. Dietary supplements of calcium, potassium, fish oil, magnesium, and garlic will also be beneficial. In order to reduce the risk for elevated CRP, weight maintenance is important. Exercises can be done regularly to keep a tight check on weight. Following these steps will keep your blood pressure and CRP levels under control, therefore, protecting you from the risk of cardiovascular disease.

 



Your Comments
Click here to add a comment
There are no comments to display
DeliciousFacebookTwitterStumbleuponGoogle BookmarksTechnorati